Alcohol addiction and alcoholism are problems in the state of Wyoming which negatively impact the lives of those addicted to alcohol and the lives of the people closest to them. Due to the intense destruction that alcohol can cause, the need for alcohol rehab and alcohol treatment in Wyoming has never been greater.

Alcohol treatment and rehabilitation in Wyoming is available to help individuals overcome alcohol addiction and alcoholism. Alcohol Rehab in Wyoming most often includes counseling, peer support and the help of specialists who can assist the individual in assessing the causes of their addiction so they can effectively resolve these issues. Effective alcohol rehabilitation in Wyoming puts the individual back in the driver seat of life, where they can begin to make positive choices and rebuild important relationships.

Long-time alcoholics in Wyoming may experience physical withdrawal when they do stop drinking. This is where an alcohol rehab and detox facility comes in. Withdrawal can be extremely uncomfortable and painful, and in very rare cases deadly. So it is very important that someone attempting to kick their alcohol addiction seeks help, instead of trying to quit on their own. At an alcohol rehab facility in Wyoming, the individual will be closely monitored and provided with the best care to successfully get through this process, to make it as smooth as possible. Knowing that someone is there to help them through it can be very reassuring.

There are a variety of alcohol rehab programs options available in Wyoming, catering to the needs of those individuals seeking help. There are Long-term Alcohol Rehabilitation Programs, Outpatient Alcohol Rehabs, Short-term Alcohol Treatment Centers, Inpatient Alcohol Rehab Facilities, support group meetings, alcohol counseling, halfway houses and sober living.

Alcohol addiction and alcoholism can have dire consequences for anyone who is affected by these serious problems. Seek alcohol treatment in Wyoming for you or someone who know today, before it is too late.


Wyoming alcohol related information and statistics are provided by the US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004. Wyoming reported a high of 118 alcohol related fatalities in 1982, the first year of reporting. The lowest number of traffic fatalities related to alcohol was in 1997, with 44 reported. The highest percentage of traffic fatalities that were alcohol related occurred in 1990, with 62%, and dropped to a low of 32% in 1997 and again in 2000. In 2008, out of all traffic fatalities, 42% involved a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher, down from 54% in 1990, but up from the previous twelve years.

The table below shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for the Wyoming, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+). It is important to note that the Wyoming drunk driving statistics, as shown below, include data from individuals who were in an alcohol-related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol-related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or bicyclist) involved in the crash has a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) value."

All 50 states in the US now apply two statutory offenses to driving under the influence of alcohol. The first (and original) offense is known either as driving under the influence (DUI), driving while intoxicated/impaired (DWI), or operating [a motor vehicle] while intoxicated/impaired (OWI). This is based upon a Wyoming police officer's observations (driving behavior, slurred speech, the results of a roadside sobriety test, etc.) The second offense is called "illegal per se", which is driving with a BAC of 0.08% or higher. Since 2002 it has been illegal in all 50 states to drive with a BAC that is 0.08% or higher. The fatality rates shown below refer to the number of people killed in all traffic accidents and, separately, in alcohol related traffic accidents, per 100 million vehicle miles traveled.

Year

Fatalities

Tot

Alc-Rel

%

0.08+

%

1982

201

118

59

105

52

1983

173

98

57

87

50

1984

157

88

56

76

48

1985

152

83

54

63

42

1986

168

92

55

83

49

1987

129

72

56

61

47

1988

155

79

51

72

46

1989

127

60

47

53

41

1990

125

77

62

68

54

1991

122

56

46

52

43

1992

118

67

57

58

49

1993

120

50

42

47

39

1994

144

72

50

66

46

1995

170

85

50

76

45

1996

143

59

42

43

30

1997

137

44

32

40

29

1998

154

71

46

60

39

1999

189

71

38

63

33

2000

152

49

32

44

29

2001

186

82

44

71

38

2002

176

67

38

60

34

2003

165

62

38

50

30

2004

164

59

36

54

33

2005

170

65

38

56

33

2006

195

78

40

67

35

2007

150

55

37

49

33

2008

159

75

47

67

42



2003-2004 Wyoming Alcohol Related Issue: Percentage % Ranking

Alcohol Abuse or Dependence

9.39%

[10th of 51]

Alcohol consumption > Binge drinkers

16.1%

[20th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Casual drinkers

57.1%

[25th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Heavy drinkers

4.4%

[37th of 52]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities

59

[44th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities (per capita)

1.158 per 10,000 people

[2nd of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities, as a percentage

36%

[39th of 51]

Alcohol Use in the Past Month

51.43%

[23rd of 51]

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2003-2004, Office of Applied Studies 2003-2004 and the MADD Official Website statistics 2004

When is a driver considered to be legally drunk in Wyoming?

  • Non-commercial drivers age 21+ are considered legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .08 or more.
  • Drivers of commercial vehicles are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .04 percent or greater. In Wyoming, school bus drivers are commercial drivers.
  • Drivers under 21 are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .02 or more.

Penalties for Drunk Driving in Wyoming

  • A first-time offender in Wyoming faces up to six months imprisonment, a fine of up to $750, or both. The driver's license suspension period is 90 days.
  • A person in Wyoming who commits a second DWI within five years of the first conviction faces seven days to six months imprisonment and a fine of $200 to $750. The driver's license suspension period is one year.
  • A person in Wyoming convicted of a third DWI within five years faces 30 days to six months imprisonment and a fine of $750 to $3,000. The driver's license suspension period is one year.
  • A person in Wyoming who is convicted of a fourth or subsequent DWI within five years faces up to two years imprisonment and a fine of up to $10,000. The driver's license suspension period is three years.

Enhanced Penalties for Drunk Driving that Causes Serious Bodily Injury

A person in Wyoming who drives drunk and causes another person to suffer serious bodily injury faces six months to one year in prison, a fine of $2,000 to $5,000, or both. A person who was previously convicted of drunk driving in Wyoming that caused serious bodily injury faces up to 20 years in prison. Under Wyoming law, "serious bodily injury" means bodily injury that creates a reasonable likelihood of death or which causes miscarriage or serious permanent disfigurement or protracted loss or impairment of any bodily member or organ.

Ignition Interlock

A person whose driver's license was suspended as a result of a DWI in Wyoming may apply for an ignition interlock restricted license after serving at least 45 days of the suspension period. If granted, the offender will be required to operate only a motor vehicle equipped with an ignition interlock device for the balance of the suspension period or for one year, whichever time period is greater.

Commercial Drivers

In addition to other penalties that may apply under Wyoming's DWI laws, a commercial driver who commits a first DWI while driving any vehicle will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for at least one year. If, however, the driver was operating a commercial vehicle and transporting hazardous materials at the time, the disqualification period is at least three years. A commercial driver who commits a second DWI while driving any vehicle in Wyoming will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for life, which may or may not be reduced to a period of not less than 10 years.

Drivers Under 21

A driver under 21 who commits a youthful driver DWI in Wyoming is subject to a fine of up to $750 for the first violation. The driver's license suspension period in Wyoming is 90 days. For a second conviction within one year, the underage offender faces up to one month imprisonment, a fine of up to $750, or both. The driver's license suspension period is six months. For a third conviction within two years, the underage offender faces up to six months imprisonment, a fine of up to $750, or both. The driver's license suspension period may be greater than six months.

What is Wyoming's Limitation of Liability Statute?

Under this statute, a person who has legally provided alcohol to another is not liable for damages caused by the intoxication. Liability, however, can attach if a licensed drinking establishment or a homeowner illegally sold or furnished alcohol to a person under 21 and the underage drinker causes a third party to suffer an injury.

Criminal Penalty for Selling or Furnishing Alcohol to Minors

In Wyoming, it is crime to sell or furnish alcohol to any person under 21. This crime is punishable by a term of imprisonment of up to six months, a fine of up to $750, or both.

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  • Facts
  • People under the age of 21 are exposed to about three television commercials per day which encourage them to drink alcohol.
  • According to a recent survey, an estimated 62% of adult men reported drinking alcohol in the last 30 days and were more likely to binge drink than women (47%) during the same time period.
  • The first mention of alcohol in the Hebrew Bible occurs in the book of Genesis. It is written that Noah drank too much wine made from the vineyards he planted after the flood.
  • Long-term alcohol consumption can cause respiratory dangers include respiratory depression and failure, pneumonia, tuberculosis, and lung abscesses.